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Abstract Detail


Ecological Section

Dorsey, Ann [1].

Habitat Specificity, Life Histories, and Physiology of Rare and Common Dudleya taxa of the Santa Monica Mountains, USA.

Dudleyas are succulent perennials, five of which are restricted to the Santa Monica Mountains and federally listed as threatened. Three common species occur locally as well. This study compares differences in habitat specificity, reproductive strategies, plant size, dormancy periods of each taxa within and between 3 watering regimes, plant growth and survival in a coastal and an inland garden, and root:shoot rations of plants in a brick wall common garden. Rare taxa grew on substrates facing close to north or that were shaded, had a greater percentage of seedlings reproduce in their first and second spring, fewer average number of fruits, smaller seed sets, and tended to be smaller than the common taxa. Plants in the coastal garden had longer and a greater number of leaves and better survival percentages than plants grown in the inland garden. Differences between coastal garden and inland garden plants were greater for rare taxa than for common ones. Germination percentages, seedling survival, and periods of dormancy did not differ between rare and common taxa. Ultimately, the purpose of the study is to find reasons for the differences in the abundances of these taxa.


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1 - California State University, Northridge, Biology Department, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA, 91330, USA

Keywords:
Dudleya
rare plants
life history.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Sections
Session: 58
Location: 215/SUB
Date: Wednesday, July 30th, 2008
Time: 10:15 AM
Number: 58002
Abstract ID:116


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