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Abstract Detail


Demand for Botanists on Public Lands: Challenges and Solutions

Sundberg, Marshall [1].

Canadian and U.S. Trends in Botanical Instruction.

The decline in basic botanical instruction during the past 40 years is well documented in the U.S. Botany departments have been merged into large biology departments or split into new departments such as Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and Cellular and Molecular Biology. Courses in botany have been lost, particularly in traditional fields such as taxonomy and, to a lesser extent, anatomy and morphology. The latter trends are most noticeable as you move from 4-year colleges, through masters universities to doctoral universities. Similar trends are apparent in Canada but there are some noticeable differences. Bachelors universities in Canada offer significantly more botany courses than either bachelors or masters universities in the U.S. and are comparable to their masters granting counterparts. In fact, the proportion of botany departments at the bachelors or masters level is greater in Canada than in the U.S. In Canada, taxonomy courses are still offered in many bachelors institutions but at the masters and doctoral levels, the decline is comparable to that found in U.S. universities. In Canada the most noticeable declines in botanical course offerings are anatomy and morphology.


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1 - Emporia State University, Biological Sciences, Box 4050, 1200 Commercial Street, Emporia, Kansas, 66801, USA

Keywords:
curriculum
departments
Canada
United States
botany.

Presentation Type: Symposium or Colloquium Presentation
Session: S12
Location: 182/I K Barber
Date: Wednesday, July 30th, 2008
Time: 10:00 AM
Number: S12004
Abstract ID:194


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