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Abstract Detail


Systematics/Phytogeography / Taxonomie/ Section

Jaén-Molina, Ruth [1], Caujapé-Castells, Juli [1].

Testing the performance of 10 universal cp-microsatellite sequences as a new technical tool to investigate micro-evolutionary problems in the Canarian Flora.

Many Canary Island plants investigated so far under phylogenetic and biogeographic perspectives display a paucity of variation at the species level in the sequences of various DNA regions. Examples of this finding are abundant and span many lineages with an important endemic contingent in this archipelago, like Echium (Boraginaceae) [Böhle et al 1996], Argyranthemum (Asteraceae) [Francisco-Ortega et al. 1997], Bencomia (Rosaceae) [Helfgott et al. 2000], Crambe (Brassicaceae) [Fuertes-Aguilar et al. 2002], Sideritis (Lamiaceae) [Barber et al. 2002], Lotus (Fabaceae) [Allan et al. 2004], Convolvulus (Convolvulaceae) [Carine et al. 2004] or Parolinia (Brassicaceae) [Jaén-Molina et al. 2006]. Consequently, these sequences cannot be used to address many important microevolutionary problems in the Canarian Flora that require the detection of sufficient variation at the species level and below. This present situation of diminished sequence polymorphism makes it appropriate to investigate the potential of other DNA regions or techniques that may eventually contain higher levels of polymorphism (Bussell et al. 2005, Archibald et al. 2007). In this contribution, we test the universal cp-microsatellite primers developed by Weising and Gardner (1999) in a selection of DNA samples resident at the DNA bank of the Jardín Botánico Canario “Viera y Clavijo” that includes 20 species of Canarian plant endemics encompassing 15 Angiosperm families (Table 1) to offer first insights on their amplification performance. With ca. 380 estimated endemic Pteridophyta and Spermatophyta, the Canaries are the richest plant biodiversity hot-spot in Europe and the Northern quarter of Africa, and the genera targeted by us harbor 269 of those endemics, according to Izquierdo et al. (2001) [Table 1]. Therefore, our results might set the stage for the use of these molecular markers to investigate micro-evolutionary problems in the Canarian Flora.


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1 - Jardín Botánico Canario \"Viera y Clavijo\", Biodiversidad Molecular y Banco de ADN, Ap. de correos 14 de Tafira Alta, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35017, Spain

Keywords:
Macaronesian Islands
cp-microsatellites
microevolution
endemics
conservation
Biogeography.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Sections
Session: P
Location: Ball Room & Party Room/SUB
Date: Monday, July 28th, 2008
Time: 12:30 PM
Number: PSP011
Abstract ID:213


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