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Abstract Detail


Teaching Section

Huerta, Alfredo J. [1], Smith-Huerta, Nancy L. [1].

A hands-on field/laboratory method for developing an understanding of global carbon balance issues using forest trees.

There is little doubt that global climate change is now a reality, and that human-caused increases in carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere are largely responsible. Now, more than ever, it is important to understand the scope of the problem in order to develop potential solutions. It is well known that photosynthesis is the most important natural process for removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, and that forests are the greatest absorbers of carbon dioxide at a global scale in terrestrial ecosystems. We have developed a field and laboratory-based exercise to help students estimate and appreciate the significant amounts of carbon dioxide that trees remove from the atmosphere on a local and global scale. This field/laboratory experience is based on a student team-based and hands-on approach towards understanding the issues involved. Students participating in this exercise develop an appreciation for the processes involved in carbon sequestration from leaf-level to whole tree and forest levels. Finally, participants draw conclusions utilizing their own estimations after comparing their results to published primary literature sources.


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1 - Miami University, Department of Botany, Oxford, Ohio, 45056, USA

Keywords:
CO2 fixation
Forest trees
carbon balance
global change
Laboratory exercise.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Sections
Session: P
Location: Ball Room & Party Room/SUB
Date: Monday, July 28th, 2008
Time: 12:30 PM
Number: PTS002
Abstract ID:333


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