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Abstract Detail


Evolutionary Developmental Biology (Evo-Devo)

Woollacott, Christine M [1], Cronk, Quentin [1].

Genetic control of petal morphology: the hooded mutant of sweet pea (Lathyrus odoratus).

In the early 1900s, the sweet pea, Lathyrus odoratus, contributed greatly to the establishment of genetics as a legitimate field of study. Because of its large flowers, and the great number of cultivated varieties plant breeders have developed since the plant’s documented domestication in the 1700s, Lathyrus odoratus remains an excellent system in which to study floral development. Now that the genomes of Medicago truncatula and other legumes have been sequenced, genetic analyses of related non-model legumes is possible with greater ease. The ‘hooded’ mutant of sweet pea is similar to the ‘squared standard’ mutant of Lotus, which is a loss of function mutant in a CYCLOIDEA homologue (LjCYC2). We are therefore testing the hypothesis the hooded mutant results from a loss of function of this gene. In this study both molecular and micromorphological tests of the hypothesis have been performed. In particular scanning electron microscopy (SEM) of micromorphological markers of petal identity has been used to determine whether the ‘hooded’ mutant is homeotic in nature.


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1 - University of British Columbia, Botany, Centre for Plant Research, MacMillian Building, 2357 Main Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4, Canada

Keywords:
cycloidea
Lathyrus odoratus
Floral development.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Topics
Session: P
Location: Ball Room & Party Room/SUB
Date: Monday, July 28th, 2008
Time: 12:30 PM
Number: PEV004
Abstract ID:664


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