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Abstract Detail


Biogeography

Marlowe, K. [1], Brustkern, Sarah [2], Hufford, Larry [1].

A kittentail of two colors: phylogeography of Synthyris wyomingensis (Plantaginaceae).

Synthyris wyomingensis (Plantaginaceae) is an endemic of the Central and Northern Rocky Mountains. Populations have either bluish-purple stamens (=blue morph) or whitish-yellow stamens (=white morph). Blue morph populations occupy the northern (Montana and northern/western Wyoming) and western (Idaho/Utah) part of the species range. In the southern part of their distribution, the blue morph populations are limited to alpine and open treeline environments, whereas many Montana populations are found also in lower elevation grasslands and savannas. White morph populations occupy the southeastern part of the range of the species (eastern Wyoming, Nebraska, and South Dakota), in relatively low elevation grasslands and savannas. To look for evidence of refugia and migration and gene flow between the white and blue morph populations we sampled 28 populations encompassing 130 individuals, covering most of the range of the species, for haplotype diversity in the plastid psbA-trnH and trnT-trnL intergenic spacers. We recovered 28 haplotypes, among which only five were shared between the two floral color morphs, from which we infer relatively deep temporal separation. Despite the few shared haplotypes between morphs, AMOVA found greater variation among populations than between the two morphs. A similar result has been found in two other multispecies Synthyris clades. Some sharing of haplotypes between the morphs in the Bighorn Mountains of Wyoming may be a consequence of secondary contact and gene flow. Both blue and white morphs have their most genetically diverse populations in the northern parts of their respective ranges; whereas, populations at the southern ends of the ranges have the lowest levels of haplotypic diversity. We infer relatively recent range expansions southward out of more northerly ancestral areas. Signatures of contiguous range expansion in clades in which haplotypes were shared between blue and white morphs were detected also in the results of nested clade analysis.


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1 - Washington State University, School of Biological Sciences, Po Box 644236, Pullman, Washington, 99164-4236, USA
2 - Washington State University, School of Biological Sciences, P.O. Box 644236, Pullman, WA, 99164-4236, USA

Keywords:
Synthyris
Plantaginaceae
refugia
Migration
Haplotypes
Rocky Mountains.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Topics
Session: 15
Location: 177/Law
Date: Monday, July 28th, 2008
Time: 2:15 PM
Number: 15006
Abstract ID:666


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