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Abstract Detail


Plants and fungi--growing together

Southworth, Darlene [1], Massicotte, Hugues [2].

Plants and Fungi--Growing together. BSA-CBA Joint symposium.

The interaction between plants and fungi is old, with evidence that the first land plants (c. 450 mya) had fungal symbionts. Fungi are more closely related to animals than to plants and, as a result, the primary interaction appears to be one of heterotrophy, with plants providing carbon to the fungi. Nearly all plants have fungi closely associated with roots, leaves, and sometimes flowers. The quality of the interaction between fungi and plants ranges from predation and parasitism to cooperation and mutualistic interdependence, all of which lead to strong selective outcomes. Speakers will examine the fossil record on early plant-fungal associations, and examine current interactions, including the roles of fungi in plant heat tolerance, in plant distributions, in mycorrhizal networks, and involvement with mycoheterotrophs.


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1 - Southern Oregon University, Department of Biology, 1250 Siskiyou Blvd, Ashland, Oregon, 97520-5010, USA
2 - University of Northern British Columbia, Ecosystem Science and Management, Prince George, BC, V2N4Z9, Canada

Keywords:
Fungi
mycoheterotrophy
mutualism.

Presentation Type: Symposium or Colloquium Presentation
Session: S13
Location: 178/Law
Date: Wednesday, July 30th, 2008
Time: 1:30 PM
Number: S13001
Abstract ID:75


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