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Abstract Detail


Plant Development / Développement des plantes (CBA/ABC)

Pettersson, Ryan [1], Tsukamoto, Atsuko [1], Mehroke, Jarnail [1], Singh, Santokh [1].

Senescence-related changes in climbing hydrangea (Hydrangea anomala) leaves during development.

This study investigates various physiological and biochemical changes viz. chlorophyll content, photosynthesis and transpiration rates, and protein profiles in hydrangea (Hydrangea anomala) leaves during development, especially focusing on natural autumn leaf senescence. The transpiration and photosynthesis rates for leaves during natural senescence are noted to support the link between natural senescence and the accompanying protein profile changes, especially the photosynthetic proteins and the biochemical processes in the leaves. Stress proteins, including heat shock and dehydrin, are also examined during senescence and throughout the year to identify periods of increased or decreased expression. Our results indicate a dramatic reduction in the levels of chlorophyll, key photosynthetic proteins and photosynthesis and transpiration rates with the progress of autumn senescence in hydrangea leaves, as well as increased production of stress proteins. Understanding the physiological and biochemical mechanisms of senescence may identify internal signals that allow senescence to take place.


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1 - University of British Columbia, Botany, #3529 - 6270 University Blvd., Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z4, Canada

Keywords:
senescence
Hydrangea
dehydrin.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Sections
Session: P
Location: Ball Room & Party Room/SUB
Date: Monday, July 28th, 2008
Time: 12:30 PM
Number: PPA005
Abstract ID:780


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