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Abstract Detail


Ecological Section

Sanchez-Ramos, Gerardo [1], Dirzo, Rodolfo [2], Martinez-Avalos, Jose [1], Argomedo, Alicia [3], Davila-Ruiz, Miguel [4].

Plant-animal interaction in a mexican cloud forest.

This study of plant herbivory began by our analyzing the composition, structure and floral diversity of the deciduous forest in the mountains near Gomez Farías Tamaulipas, in two types of habitats: mature forest and cleared areas left to natural regeneration. To identify the principle consumers of foliage, an analysis at the community level was conducted by taking foliar samples from the following strata: tree, bush and herbs in the rainy and dry periods of the year. To determine the agents responsible for foliar damage (insects, pathogens, and vertebrates), foliar scars were visually inspected. Additionally, foliar damage was analyzed within the two periods for 46 representative species from both types of habitats. These species represented 27 trees, 9 bushes, 2 vines and 8 herbs. Foliar parameters analyzed were toughness, pubescence, and water. These parameters were related to foliar damage. Of the total foliar damage found in 15,684 leaves, the principle cause was that of insects (53.0%); whereas, insect pathogens constituted 33.1% of the damage observed. The major impact on foliar damage occurred during the rainy period (83.3%), whereas, the frequency during the dry period was of 65.9%. Damage by vertebrate herbivores was marginal at only 0.5%. Average herbivory for the 46 species was 5.96%. The amount of foliage damaged by insects was three times greater in the rainy season (8.97%) compared to the dry season (2.94%), and this finding was statistically significant (P < 0.0001). The three physical attributes quantified (toughness, pubescence, and foliar water) were highly variable between the two periods. Foliar water was 12.7% greater in the rainy period than in the dry period, and also the density of pubescence was 6.5 times greater in the rainy period.


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1 - Universidad Autonoma de Tamaulipas, Instituto de Ecologia y Alimentos, 13 Blvd. Adolfo L. Mateos · 928, Victoria, Tamaulipas, 87040, Mexico
2 - Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Instituto de Ecología, Apartado Postal 70-275, Mexico, D.F., 04510, Mexico
3 - Universidad Autonoma de Tamaulipas,, Unidad Academica Multidisciplinaria Francisco Hernandez Garcia, Matamoros 8 y 9 Centro Universitario, Victoria, Tamaulipas, 87000, Mexico
4 - Universidad Autonoma de Tamaulipas Matamoros 8 y 9 Centro Universitar, Unidad Academica Multidisciplinaria Francisco Hernandez Garcia,, Matamoros 8 y 9 Centro Universitario, Victoria, Tamaulipas, 87000, Mexico

Keywords:
Cloud Forest
herbivory
plant-animal interaction.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Sections
Session: P
Location: Ball Room & Party Room/SUB
Date: Monday, July 28th, 2008
Time: 12:30 PM
Number: PEC035
Abstract ID:803


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