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Abstract Detail


Symbioses: Plant, Animal, and Microbe Interactions

Wellner, Misty [1], Stevens, Kevin [2], Acevedo, Miguel [3].

Dark Septate Endophyte and Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Status of Vegetation Recolonizing a Remnant Bottomland Hardwood Forest in East Texas.

Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi form symbiotic associations within the roots of most vascular plants and provide many benefits including improved nutrient uptake, flood drought resistance, and herbivore resistance. Dark septate endophyte (DSE) fungi also form symbiotic associations within plant roots. Both AM and DSE may affect plant community structure through their potential role in nutrient uptake or by mediating the negative effects of pathogen and herbivore interactions. While the majority of AM and DSE research has focused on terrestrial ecosystems it is becoming clearer that AM and DSE associations are present in wetland plant communities. Prolonged flooding that occurred during the summer of 2007 at the Greenbelt Corridor (GBC) along the Elm Fork of the Trinity River in Denton, Texas presented a unique opportunity to assess the prevalence of AM and DSE fungi in plant species recolonizing a remnant bottomland hardwood forest following an extreme weather event. Colonization was assessed in 38 species representing, two monocotyledonous and 21 dicotyledonous families. Arbuscules were found in both monocotyledonous families and 17 of the 21 dicotyledonous families. AM structures were absent from the dicotyledonous families Amaranthaceae, Brassicaceae, Phytolaccaceae and Polygonaceae. Of the species colonized, total colonization levels (DSE and AM) ranged from a low of 3.3% ± 4.0 in Rorippa sessilfora, to a high of 82.7% ± 7.2 in Chamaesyce serpens. Hyphae typical of AM associations were found in 36 species, however definitive identification of AM colonization, based on the presence of arbscules or vesicles, was possible for 31 species. At least one of the three replicates for all of the 38 species assessed harbored AM, DSE or both fungi.


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1 - University of North Texas, Department of Biological Sciences, Denton, TX, 76203, USA
2 - University of North Texas, Department of Biological Sciences, Institute of Applied Sciences, Denton, TX, 76203, USA
3 - University of North Texas, Department of Geography, Denton, TX, 76203, USA

Keywords:
bottomland hardwood forests
arbuscular mycorrhiza
dark septate endophytes
Wetland Plants.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Topics
Session: P
Location: Ball Room & Party Room/SUB
Date: Monday, July 28th, 2008
Time: 12:30 PM
Number: PSY004
Abstract ID:817


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