Unable to connect to database - 05:03:11 Unable to connect to database - 05:03:11 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 05:03:11 SQL Statement is null or not a DELETE - 05:03:11 Botany 2008 - Abstract Search
Unable to connect to database - 05:03:11 Unable to connect to database - 05:03:11 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 05:03:11

Abstract Detail


Ecology / Ecologie (CBA/ABC)

Major, K.C. [1], Nosko, Peter [1], Dech, J.P. [1].

Competitive relations of red oak and sugar maple differ between oak and pine soils.

Successful natural regeneration of red oak (Quercus rubra L.) is rare, and stands dominated by this species are being successionally replaced in Great Lakes-St Lawrence forests, largely by sugar and red maple (Acer saccharum Marsh. and A. rubrum L.) that grow more rapidly under shaded conditions. A limited number of studies and observations have suggested that oak seedling recruitment is enhanced under red and white pine canopies (Pinus strobus L. and P. resinosa Ait.); however, the factors contributing to this phenomenon remain unclear. Our study involved a 14-week greenhouse experiment specifically examining the influence of pine conditioned soil on the relative competitive ability of red oak and sugar maple. Our objectives were to: (1) compare growth and biomass allocation patterns of red oak and sugar maple seedlings planted alone (one oak or one maple seedling per pot –no competition) to those potted in conspecific pairs (two oak or two maple seedlings per pot –intraspecific competition), and those planted in non-conspecific pairs (one oak + one maple seedling per pot –interspecific competition); and (2) determine whether soil origin (mature red oak dominated stands versus mature pine stands) will impact the growth and biomass allocation patterns of oak and maple seedlings under the various competition scenarios. Vertical growth and biomass in red oak remained constant between soil types. Sugar maple seedlings; however, exhibited significant changes (decreased vertical growth, reduced leaf biomass, increased coarse root biomass) across all competition scenarios when grown in pine soil compared to oak soil. Our results suggest that increased red oak regeneration under pine may indirectly arise from reduced interspecific competition caused by decreased competitor performance. The retention of pine in oak shelterwoods, or underplanting oak seedlings under pines may be useful silvicultural approaches to promote red oak regeneration.


Log in to add this item to your schedule

1 - Nipissing University, Biology, 100 College Drive, North Bay, Ontario, P1B 8L7, Canada

Keywords:
Quercus rubra
Acer saccharum
intraspecific competition
interspecific competition
biomass allocation.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper:Papers for Sections
Session: 12
Location: 177/Law
Date: Monday, July 28th, 2008
Time: 11:00 AM
Number: 12004
Abstract ID:861


Copyright © 2000-2008, Botanical Society of America. All rights