Unable to connect to database - 09:27:30 Unable to connect to database - 09:27:30 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 09:27:30 SQL Statement is null or not a DELETE - 09:27:30 Botany 2008 - Abstract Search
Unable to connect to database - 09:27:30 Unable to connect to database - 09:27:30 SQL Statement is null or not a SELECT - 09:27:30

Abstract Detail


Systematics/Phytogeography / Taxonomie/ Section

Walker, Lia [1], Patterson, Robert [1], Lowry, David [2], Willis, John [2].

A preliminary study of the genetic variation between sympatric Mimulus, a soil endemic, and its widespread progenitor.

Mimulus cupriphilus (Phrymaceae), a member of the Mimulus guttatus complex, was described in 1989. It is a soil endemic restricted to two small copper mines in Calaveras County, California, where it grows in sympatry with its probable progenitor M. guttatus. The soils on these copper mines are highly contaminated with copper mine tailings and, as such, are highly inhospitable to most plant life. M. cupriphilus is distinguished morphologically from M. guttatus by its highly branched habit, reduced corolla spots, and pointed corolla lobes. It is also exclusively annual and self-fertilizing. Although M. cupriphilus and M. guttatus are capable of hybridizing, they maintain their species integrity. Samples of M. cupriphilus were collected from numerous sites in the area and compared with nearby populations of the widespread M. guttatus using two nuclear genes. Phylogenetic relationships were investigated using maximum likelihood analyses.


Log in to add this item to your schedule

1 - San Francisco State University, Department of Biology, 1600 Holloway Avenue, San Francisco, California, 94132
2 - Duke University, University Program in Genetics and Genomics, 124 Science Drive, 3332 French Family Science Center, Durham, NC, 27708, USA

Keywords:
Mimulus
soil contamination
Endemic.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Sections
Session: P
Location: Ball Room & Party Room/SUB
Date: Monday, July 28th, 2008
Time: 12:30 PM
Number: PSP075
Abstract ID:898


Copyright 2000-2008, Botanical Society of America. All rights