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Abstract Detail


The Future of Botany Teaching

Stanley, Ethel [1].

Designing Accessible Investigative Biology Cases for Community College Students.

Community college students have been underserved by biology curriculum developers, even though community college biology course instructors teach half the nation’s undergraduates their introductory biology. There are three phases in investigative case-based learning or ICBL. In the first phase, problem posing, students read the case and work collaboratively to analyze the case, to structure their own learning of both science process and content, and to identify areas they need to learn more about. In the second phase, problem solving, students define and undertake investigations in which they use observational skills, propose hypotheses, design experiments, gather data, use models, interpret graphs, and support their conclusions with evidence. In the last phase of ICBL, peer persuasion, they present their findings to others using a wide variety of potential formats. This three phase process: problem posing, problem solving, and peer persuasion follows closely the activities of practicing scientists. Faculty can learn to develop their own cases that utilize selected, realistic, meaningful and contemporary problems to engage students in bioscientific investigation. Available copies of “Biological Inquiry: A Workbook of Investigative Cases” will offer everyone who attends the opportunity to examine some carefully crafted biology teaching cases that work well at the community college level.


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1 - Beloit College, BioQUEST Curriculum Consortium, 700 College Street, Beloit, WI, 53511

Keywords:
community college botany
ICBL
problem posing
problem solving
peer persuasion
practicing scientist.

Presentation Type: Symposium or Colloquium Presentation
Session: S5
Location: 157/Law
Date: Monday, July 28th, 2008
Time: 3:20 PM
Number: S5005
Abstract ID:980


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